Scaling up

Most spinout companies from universities have the ambition to be companies of scale.  If they are to win significant investment at an early stage, they will need to demonstrate that they have a ‘road map’ to enable them to establish a strong position in their chosen market.

However, this ‘road map’ passes through different stages, each
of which places different demands on the company founders.  Initially, the spinout founders will be immensely relieved to have completed the spinout process itself, with the knotty issues of IP ownership, and the relationship of the academic founders with the university.  The next stage is generally one of spending (on prototypes, clinical trials, and other proofs of technology) rather than selling.  As a very broad generalisation, academics in spinout companies are more comfortable with the ongoing research and development (which is in many ways similar to their academic work) than in market analysis, recruitment and team building, or the management of premises, financial records, and all the other administrative tasks which are essential to get a start-up company on its feet.

The next stage is growth.  For all young companies, whether spinouts or not, there are natural barriers to growth.  Winning Pitch identifies the most important of these as the emotional cost and the financial cost.

The emotional cost to the individuals involved is usually manifested in self imposed pressure, and in the uncertainty that demands resilience and mental toughness to keep going when the inevitable road blocks are presented.
A scale up company is defined as one that grows its employee or turnover at a rate of 20 per cent per annum over a three-year period, and the financial costs of doing this can rack up very quickly – the cost of recruiting new talent, and of raising finance, professional fees, new premises, IT infrastructure and administrative costs can shoot through the roof.  Costs must be controlled and the execution of a growth plan needs to be effectively choreographed – clear roles need to be defined, people need to be accountable for delivering on their tasks.  Very rarely can growth be achieved without impacting on profitability.
This is why the majority of the 500,000 of last year’s new start-ups will never go on to employ one person never mind 10, and also why over 99% of UK firms employ fewer than 50 people.  Very often it’s the financial cost of growth that holds individuals back.

What does this mean for academics spinning out a new company from a university?

The main point to recognise is that no one entrepreneur can build a business alone – it takes a team, combining the different skills needed to grow the business.  The second point to recognise is that as the team grows, different leadership challenges emerge as the culture of the business evolves.  At Winning Pitch we refer to the ‘growth staircase’, with different challenges as the number of staff increases.  When the company reaches 7-12 people, the entrepreneur has become an ‘entrepreneurial social worker’.  At 25 or more people, the business culture becomes ‘the team vs. the mob’.  With 50 or more staff, the business needs to evolve towards a corporate culture, where processes need to be standardised and continually improved, with less scope for individual innovation.  Individuals who can take a company through all these stages are rare indeed, and academic entrepreneurs do well to realise that at some stage in the company’s development, the business will be best served if the reins are handed over to others with practical experience of running a large and growing company.

To find out more about the challenges of scaling up, and about the ‘growth staircase’, contact:

John Leach
0161 876 4922
j.leach@winning-pitch.co.uk
www.winning-pitch.co.uk

Posted on Wednesday, 06 May 2015